May 3, 2010

Image Transfer - The Saga Continues

I'm having a lot of fun experimenting with different image transfer techniques.  These are pictures of  flowers growing in my yard.
Materials: 8x8 stretched canvas, gesso, DASS transfer film, DASS SuperSauce
Technique: gesso canvas, apply DASS SuperSauce, transfer image
Note:  This is my favorite result thus far.  On close examination one can see some air bubbles in the print, this is my fault.  This is new to me, so further practice is needed.

Materials: painter's unprimed canvas, TAP (transfer artist paper)
Technique: inkjet print image on TAP, transfer image using household iron
Note:   did not work (for me) on canvas - a lot of the ink did not transfer - the hand of the fabric is very rough

Materials: pima cotton, TAP (transfer artist paper)
Technique: inkjet print image on TAP, transfer image using household iron
Note:   this image is much clearer - all of the ink transferred in just a few seconds.  Next time I will trim more of the white edge off before transferring it - it's hard to see here, but it does show up on the white pima

Materials: Lutrador, TAP (transfer artist paper)
Technique: inkjet print image on TAP, transfer image using household iron
Note:   it appears that the image did not transfer well but that's because of the texture of the Lutrador.  Actually, the print came out quite well.  Again, I would trim more of the white edge off.

Materials:  Strathmore Iron-On Transfer Sheets, pima cotton
Technique:  inkjet print image on transfer sheet, transfer image using household iron
Note:  surprisingly,  this paper looks and feels identical to TAP - but as you can see here my results are very different.  Whereas, it took a very short time to transfer the TAP image with a hot iron, the directions on the Strathmore read 2-3 minutes of constant movement with a hot iron.  My arm was tired before the stated time was up and most of the ink stayed on the paper!  I did it twice - neither result is satisfactory

Materials:  Strathmore Iron-On Transfer Sheets, Lutrador
Technique:  inkjet print image on transfer sheet, transfer image using household iron
Note:  the transferred image is on left - again disappointing results!

Materials: Ink-Aid white matte precoat, pima cotton 
Technique:  Apply one or two coats InkAid to pima cotton (let dry thoroughly between coats).  I only applied one coat of InkAid on this sample.  Inkjet print directly on pima cotton
Note:  The top print is fabulous!  I only show the second one because at first I was really disappointed with the printed results - then I realized the print heads were clogged.  Once I "cleaned" the print heads, the results were dramatically different.  I printed on the reverse side of the cotton - waste not, want not!!
The hand of the fabric is much like that using DASS film and Purell hand sanitizer.

You may have different results with these materials and techniques.  I'm looking forward to experimenting some more!

5 comments:

joey said...

Love what you have done. ! I have never heard of Ink-aid. I would love to try this. It looks so beautiful. hugs and love, joey

My Crafty Little Page said...

How interesting and btw...I like the first one best. The one where all the ink didn't transfer - it looks like a painting! :) Nancy

Natasha said...

How interesting- I have never heard of this before. The effect is quite stunning.

Best wishes for a happy week,
Natasha.

Anonymous said...

I tried using TAP (transfer artist paper) on primed canvas and it didn't work. Should I gesso the canvas and then try the tap? How would you recommend that I get the tap to work on the canvas? Thanks! Great Pictures!

Pat said...

I didn't have much luck with using TAP on canvas. Using gesso may work. You may want to contact Lesley Riley she developed the stuff http://www.lesleyriley.com/contact.php and pose the question. It would be a shame to waste any more of the product if you don't have to. Let me know what you find out. Good luck and thank you for visiting my blog!

Kind regards,
Pat